… just a couple of Tourists

Everybody dreams of a Universal Camera … well that’s what Kodak said in an advertisement for their new camera, the Kodak Tourist. The Tourist line (ok, a line to two models) were the last of the folders that they produced. The first model was in production between 1948 – 51.

Tourists

In my opinion, they were big and ugly … but many Kodak cameras were no deigned to be awesomely attractive … after all, they are primarily a film company. Both were designed with an aluminum body, a plastic top cover, and covered on the outside with Kodadur leather (yeah, they had their own special brand of synthetic leatherette).

Both were medium format folders that used 620 film and produced eight 6×9 exposures. FYI, 620 is the same stock size as 120 except that it wound on  a thinner spool. Different variations different shutter and lens combinations … Kodon+Kodet, Diomatic+Anaston, Synchro-Rapid+Anastar. The ones I happen to have came with the Kodon shutter that had a three settings, I, B, and T.  the I was about 1/60s. The aperture ranged from f/12.5 to 32. The Kodet lens is a fixed focus single element 86mm focal length.

The models that I have received came with a fixed focus single element Kodet 86mm f/12.5 lens in Flash Kodon shutter app. 1/50 sec plus bulb and time

KodakAdapterKit

The “universal” thing about the camera was the adapter kit … “4 picture sizes with 1 camera”. It allowed the camera to shoot in different formats and even use different film … Bantam 828 film, half 620, square 620, full 620.

As you can notice in the image (that one to the left), the film back can be removed because it is double hinged.

The second model, which happens to be called the Tourist II had some slight modifications … made between 1951 – 58, and was the last of the Kodak folders.

Goodwill hunting.

Back in Sept. I was hunting around for some stuff on Goodwill’s online auction site … most of the time I lose out to people that are willing to pay lots of money … well I lucked out on a lot of folding cameras.

8cams

After some delay, I have started to work on some of them.

As you would expect … I will be posting about them.

Family Tree … Shikata ga nai

I have been working on researching my Family Tree for some time years now. I started with the goal of going back in generations to find those that came to Canada and their connections … but it ended quickly as records of those in Japan are not publicly available. If you haven’t figured out yet … I am Canadian of Japanese descent … a Japanese Canadian.

Limited to those records of anyone coming or going … or anything recorded in Canada … I had to go sideways. First I started to gather around my immediate family, but then thing started to branch further out. My family tree has ended up looking like an Aspen forest … all connected at the root with trunks popping up everywhere. For example I was just working on an entry for my the “paternal grandfather of husband of sister-in-law of sister-in-law of brother-in-law of brother-in-law of paternal 1st cousin of wife of brother-in-law of aunt of wife of my uncle”

Recently I have noticed talk about redress. Now the Federal government of Canada formally apologized in 1988, and also put together a $300 million compensation (redress) program … but it was only in 2012 that the province of British Columbia government (where pretty much all of the Japanese lived) apologized and they did not include any efforts towards redress. It was the province of BC that really pushed for the removal of the Japanese. So now various Japanese Canadian groups have gotten together to formally request this … I hope BC will do what’s right.

Now the only reason I brought that up is because of my research. One of the only reason’s I am able to get soooooo many people in my Tree was because of the RCMP records of the interment of the Japanese.

So far I have about 200+ in my family tree that have some interment record, though everyone has in some way been affected by what happened … and it keeps on going. As I have been using Ancestry.com, they often pop up hints … one of the types of hints comes from other member trees. As I go wider more and more member hints appear, but when I take a look at their facts I noticed one fact that is always missing … Interment. Hmm, I actually had to add a fact called “Interment” to the family tree app because it did not have such a thing.

Shikata ga nai 

Recording my family’s info of internment was one of the reasons I started building my family tree online, so others will know when/where about it. These are things not simply discussed with their children in many Canadian Japanese homes, even though years of their lives were affected by this … though many did go to Interment reunions.

Well, I’m making it a Fact … Japanese people were interred, their property removed, their citizenship removed, and physically removed (some “sent back to where they came from”) by the Government (spearheaded by the provincial Government of British Columbia, Canada).

One thing my wife told me … I am not just doing this for myself anymore, I am recording this for all those that need to know what happened.

So if you are doing a genealogical research on your Japanese Canadian family, and you encounter hints on Ancestry about Internment … well, it’s probably me.

I know this ain’t going to be pretty!

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So I have a camera with a problem.

As you can see there is something wrong with the shutter blades … yeah.

This ain’t no simple blades popping out of the slot issue, this one I know is really broken.

Well time to take a look inside.

I was advised that getting to the shutter on a Nikon FM2 was not that difficult … there is a pretty good video on YouTube showing how to get the mirror box off.

Now I have to warn you that the images show some parts that were taken off already … I don’t tend to document in sequential order as I go …

Ok, lets start from the top.

DSC00713First, remove rewind knob using the typical method is used. Under it is a tension clip thin and a washer.

The shutter speed dial is secured with 3 screws. Remove and pull off.

Advance lever … first remove cover leatherette, then unscrew the cap. Remove the lever and be aware of the spring underneath.

Finally the top cover, it is held on by five screws, pull off top plate.

DSC00714Note that there are two plastic parts, one on each side of the prism that will fall off as they are only held on by the top cover.

For a mechanical camera, the FM2 has a complicated electronic light meter system … it actually has dual SPD photosensors, so there is a lot of wires. I decided to loosen some wires by desoldering some of them.

Remove the bottom plate. Three screws.

DSC00718I desoldered the black wire to battery terminal (blue wire), red and orange to winder contacts … loosen white wire from glue.

Now open the back door.

Remove the single black screw.

DSC00715OK, now the front of the camera.

The lens mount … four screws.

 

 

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There is a metal ring underneath … note it’s orientation … then take it off.

DSC00716Now there are some things left … there is a plastic ring with string attached and an inner metal ring that is tapered – thin side down.

DSC00717You can pull those out and put the one with the string aside.

Now you can unscrew front plastic cover two screws … pass plastic ring through it.

Self timer lever … take off the leatherette. Remove screw and self timer lever.

OK getting close now. Remove front two leatherette patches.

There are five screws that hold the mirror box/prism on. Remove.

Annotation 2019-06-16 163208There are three screws on either side of the viewfinder port … and one below the shutter speed dial that has a spring (not the other screw).

OK, this is the hard part … peeling off the top and moving it aside. You will encounter some old sticky foam.

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Now here is where the video (I noted at the beginning) ends.

The shutter housing and the gears can be remove just by taking off the two brass top screws … do a little wiggling and pull off shutter.

DSC00720The back side of the shutter housing plate is held on by a couple of screws.DSC00721Then slide off.

 

 

 

 

More layers, more screws.

Make note of the tiny springs that are attached to both of the shutter blade sets.

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You can now remove both sets of shutters.

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So here is the second curtain. One of the blades actually snapped the metal into two … well that is not something you repair, just replace.

Putting the camera back together was not all that difficult either.

This one is now relegated to the parts bin … just to wait for another FM2 or an FE2 to land in my lap.

Hmm, I just realized I didn’t even check if the light meter was working …

The adventures of this guy who tries to restore and repair vintage photographic equipment … and wins (most of the time).

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