… the next restoration will be … delayed.

You will all probably have to wait for Q3 until I add another photo restoration/repair post … why, cause I ain’t got none.

I spend the first part of this year selling off all the stuff that I worked on last year to build up the funds necessary to get new stuff.

I will be adding posts, but not specifically photo related … or even about repairs.

Ah, if anyone wants to donate “stuff”, I will be happy to take it off your hands.

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Life is like a box of chocolates …

You never know what you’re gonna to get.

My last surprise was the Ricoh Wide.

The new surprise … to me it was just another broken camera that was able to pickup cheap and put back into working condition … was another Mamiya Six that I got last year.

Welllll, it appears that it was not just any Mamiya Six … it happened to be an uncommon version of the many variants that were made.

I like to make sure I describe my auctions accurately so I do a lot of searching on the web. I listed the camera as a IIa version and was questioned by Don@eastwestphoto … I did agree that it was unusual to be this version, and there was only one reference to a IIa by Dirk Spennemen but Don has not seen any other references that it did actually exist. After some discussion back and forth he figured out that I actually had a 1942 Mamiya Six IIa.

“Its a very late model lla = tear drop exposure counter, three screws in acc. shoe, f/22 on DOF scale, two strut rails, round front larger standard for a 00 shutter. Known lens & shutter of the period 1944, its a WW2 booty camera, they were never imported in the USA. Quite RARE ***** star rating in Sugiyama’s 1984 collectible Japanese camera book is for model ll, lla is even rarer! . I just found a reference to a model lla, I think maybe you are correct?”

Don has a new addition to his large Mamiya Six collection.


Waz DAT ?

Sooo, a couple of days ago I heard a small snipped of a song on TV which I remembered that I liked a lot … then I remembered that I actually had a copy of it on tape … yes, TAPE.

Back in the olden days we used to record music on magnetic tape, but I ain’t taking about yrrr typical compact cassette, I’m talking about Digital Audio Tape. Sony introduced DAT in 1987 … it recorded 16-bit digital on magnetic tape and supported recording program numbers and ID’s, which is why it was most common in recording studios. Back in my yuut I had much money, and being a tech geek, I thought paying $600 (I was able to get it at cost price, and it was the lowest consumer model) was great for a digital recorder.

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Sooo, back to the story … I rummaged around my tapes and found it … Panic in Detroit, by David Bowie. Great !!! I popped it into my Sony DTC-750 DAT deck and created an MP3 on my MacBook. Hmm, since I am here, lets look for some other songs … and that’s when the problems appeared. It started with not pulling the tape back into the cassette (a DAT loading is like a VHS tape … hmm, not sure how many of you remember those either … the tape gets pulled out and wrapped to a helical scan drum), so when it was ejected it left the tape exposed and crinkled. I realized that there was a problem with the pickup spools not being engaged by the motor properly … or the motor is dying, as FF and RW are very sluggish !!

Well, since I don’t have any cameras that I need to work on (actually, that is a big lie as there are two cameras that need the seals replaced, but I am stalling on that job) I am going try to get this thing working.

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I did some presearch on the web to see if this was common or if anyone else had documented taking this thing apart … and I was in luck.

It was not too difficult to get the main part out.

 

 

DSC03994Looking over the gears, I did not see anything obviously broken.

Stuff turned, moved …

Hmmm, so I put it back together and seated it back in … powered it up, and started watching the mechanisms as it loaded, played, reverse play … ah, there seems to be a problem here.

When the reverse play is engaged, the drive motor does not move … so this causes the pickup spool not to turn … which in turn causes the tape to turn into a pile of spagetti.
DSC03993 Well, the motor does turn and the belt looks ok … so I am guesing the motor is dying (the thing is 30 years old).

I figured that it probably was not worth it to get a replacement part … so I just sprayed some Lighter Fluid into the openeings, and hope for the best. I thought it would clean out any gunge (even though it would flush any lubricant on any bearings).

Letting it dry, I put it back together and exersized it by FF and RW a tape over and over … well, it appears my bet paid off … now I can sit back, listen, and relive the 80’s.


Did some baking today …

Couple of weeks ago my old ASUS ROG G60Vx laptop started showing vertical red lines after booting into the Windows desktop … ok, lets try getting into the BIOS but I could not read anything on the screen … hmm, looks like the graphics chip is going kaputs. Time to look for a replacement video card.

Hunting around I realized that a replacement card is not going to come so cheap. Ok, not really a problem as we have multiple Windows laptops and MacBooks in our household.

I really don’t like disposing of things that could be brought back to life … so today I decided to try the old temp bake job. Typically the cause of graphics card failure is the soldering contacts between the GPU and the PCB. The technique of baking is to re-flow the solder and bond it back together.

I pulled out the PCIe graphics card, and preheated the oven. Solder typically has a melting point of 188C/370F, so I set it to 375F. I wrapped some tin foil to cover the surrounding parts, and also make some legs to elevate it. I placed this on a pizza plate ,that has holes in it, and left it in for 10min … then left it to cool with the door open. I noticed on the web about discussions concerning fumes from the PCB board … since my GPU is on a small board I was not too concerned.

Ok, so the baking is done … clean off the old thermal paste … get rid of some dust … boot up, and hope for the best … BONUS !!! I have a BIOS screen I can read, and no artifacts showing when I booted up into Windows.

Now for all of you others thinking of doing this … this is just a temp job, the soldering will fail again at some point in time … or you can over-heat the board too much and damage other components.


Canon … Canonet QL17 G-III … shutter, well almost.

Hmm, sticky shutter … seems to be a common theme with older cameras, at least the ones the I get a hold of.

Tools: spanner wrench

DSC00512 Unlike the Olympus that I worked on previously, the front lens plate is secured by an outter locking ring that is unscrewed.

The inner ring can be removed if you need to get in between the front lens group … this will not get you closer to the shutter blades.

 

 

 

 
DSC00511Under neath is a plate that changes the amount of light hitting the exposure meter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ok here is where you will need the special tool … welllll I don’t got one, so I am stuck with only going this far.

I tried using a rubber friction tool, but this front group was really secured … probably never taken off before.

Not much access to anything here.

So, how did I free the shutter? As is common with many shutters, the rear lens cell can be unscrewed. This allowed me to access the blades, and get some fluid on it to loosen it up.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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