Olympus-35 SP, inside the top

So next step, even though I didn’t have to, is to open the top of the Olypus to clean the rangefinder.

Note: for horizontal adjustments to the rangefinder patch you do not have to take the top cover off. Open the film back and you will see a screw in the top middle of the film plane. Unscrew this to reveal a smaller recessed screw. Turn this to adjust.

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Use the spanner wrench to unscrew the cap on the winding arm, and then take the parts off. Open the film back and jam the rewind, then you can unscrew the rewind knob.

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You will see in the above image that the top of the camera has scratches from the winding arm. Due to the cover securing nut coming loose the winding arm was not sitting high enough.

Using the spanner wrench again you can unscrew both sides before you can pull off the cover. Note that there is a wire that connects to the hot shoe, so try not to yank too hard.

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The rangefinder area is covered with black paper. You will also figure out if the spotmeter button is broken. In my case the plastic was broken, but there is enough of it to keep the button from falling into the camera.

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Carefully pull off the paper. Now you can clean the insides.

I did not fiddle around with figuring out what screw adjusts the vertical alignment of the rangefinder patch … but it could be the circular knurled black plastic thing in the middle lens (some others have mentioned the recessed screw between the diodes, but it is said that is not correct).

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Olympus-35 SP … the shutter.

This camera had one issue … the self timer lever got loose and fell into the body of the lens, which cause other things to jam up. So now time to get to the shutter mechanism.

Tools, well you should be able to figure that out by now.

Warning … there are many unsecured things in this complicated shutter!!

DSC00520As I swore about before … the first thing to remove is the nameplate. On this particular version the nameplate is glued on … you might find a model that has this as a threaded ring, so check before spending the next hour trying to get it off.

 

 

 

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So after prying it off (without bending it) you can now unscrew the front group of elements with your spanner wrench.

Under that you will see three screws that hold on the rest of the rings.

 

 

 

 

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There are three rings that will come off.

After removing the screws, carefully take off the securing ring and then the shutter speed ring.

 

 

 

 

 

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Once you get down to here, you will find this inner plate and underneath there will be some brass washers and a thing for the aperture ring steps

 

 

 

 

 

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OK, so these are those things left over that you should now see … put aside the washers and the step metal thing,

Set the focus at minimum. remove the five screws holding the cover on, then take it off.

 

 

 

 

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Remove the shutter speed cam plate.

Note its position.

Try to keep this camera on its back, as there are many shutter items that will fall out.

 

 

 

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The shutter cocking ring, in the middle is spring loaded.

Note the many levers, gears, and things that connect to this ring.

Remove the ring.

The self timer lever is at 11 oclock and it has a spring to keep the arm in a clockwise position.

 

 

 

DSC00503This image shows it after I screwed it back on.

Self-timer gears are at 9 oclock and slow shutter speed gears are at 6 oclock.

When putting the shutter cocking ring back on you will need to move some levers in their set position … like the two at 1 and 2 oclock. Th ring should sit low enough that the shutter speed cam plate does not impede its movement.

You will need to move the shutter speed cam plate around to get the little arms to engage in the slots … before you put the cover plate on. Things should rotate cleanly after you put the cover on, if not, take it off and adjust things.

 

 

 

 


Tanks.

As expected, the number of visitors to my blog has been increasing since its start just some 4 years ago … so thanks for viewing my stuff (not that stuff). This year I actually got over 10,000 views. I don’t think I will be breaking any blog records with that, but it is nice that my efforts are not worthless.

As I briefly mentioned in a previous post … I am a little delayed in my new ones. I’ve run into some parts issues that have prevented me from posting, but they will be up soon (I hope) …


Opps …

Made some errors on my mercury battery post … which is now corrected.

Blame the beer !!!


I pity the tool !!!

Sometimes yah just can’t win … many cameras utilized specalized manufacturing techniques to get everything together. When servicing these camera’s, you really should have the tools that were designed to work on these things.

One of them is a flexiclamp/ring wrench, the tool to remove the various retaining rings used on cameras without scratching them.

Some are very specific to a camera … which I just found out about the Canonet QL17 G-III. I encountered difficulty getting into the shutter mechanism because the front lens group put up a fight. Most other cameras of this type that I have worked on just required a spanner wrench or a rubber friction thingy … not this camera.

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This tool is used to work on the front lens group (as noted in the service manual).

I can see why this is needed … the group is screwed on very tightly so friction doesn’t work. A spanner wrench is too wide to fit in the tight space. Even using my super strong stainless steel tweezers didn’t work, even though I could force it wide enough to connect to the slots, I could not get enough grip to prevent it from slipping.


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