Category Archives: Cameras

… bad Luck.

Follow up to my last post …

The shutter is … well, lets say that I should start seriously looking into on how to replace curtains.

It did not take much to tear the material. Just exersizing the shutter put enough stress on it that the second curtain fell apart.

Minolta really put some poor quality material there … oh, well.

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Lucky … no, not my cat.

“Luck, that’s when preparation and opportunity meet” – Pierre Trudeau

… yeah, I have a cat named Lucky … cause he is.

Sooooo, in my current hunt for broken stuff I decided to go back to a risky comfort zone item. This is the Minolta-35 LTM rangefinder camera.

The risk part is the high probability of finding one that has a degraded shutter, and replacing shutters is not something I like to do … I’ve attempted it a couple of times and it ain’t easy.

The comfort part … well, I’ve probably worked on about a half a dozen of these.

Anyway, I took a chance on an auction and got a body with a lens at a pretty low price … and luck was on my side, the shutter is in almost working condition !!! Woo Hooo !! Bonus !! The rest of the camera I really did not care about as I have two parts bodies sitting on my desk.

… and after I restore it, someone will be lucky to be a new owner of a working Minolta-35.


Life is like a box of chocolates …

You never know what you’re gonna to get.

My last surprise was the Ricoh Wide.

The new surprise … to me it was just another broken camera that was able to pickup cheap and put back into working condition … was another Mamiya Six that I got last year.

Welllll, it appears that it was not just any Mamiya Six … it happened to be an uncommon version of the many variants that were made.

I like to make sure I describe my auctions accurately so I do a lot of searching on the web. I listed the camera as a IIa version and was questioned by Don@eastwestphoto … I did agree that it was unusual to be this version, and there was only one reference to a IIa by Dirk Spennemen but Don has not seen any other references that it did actually exist. After some discussion back and forth he figured out that I actually had a 1942 Mamiya Six IIa.

“Its a very late model lla = tear drop exposure counter, three screws in acc. shoe, f/22 on DOF scale, two strut rails, round front larger standard for a 00 shutter. Known lens & shutter of the period 1944, its a WW2 booty camera, they were never imported in the USA. Quite RARE ***** star rating in Sugiyama’s 1984 collectible Japanese camera book is for model ll, lla is even rarer! . I just found a reference to a model lla, I think maybe you are correct?”

Don has a new addition to his large Mamiya Six collection.


Canon … Canonet QL17 G-III … shutter, well almost.

Hmm, sticky shutter … seems to be a common theme with older cameras, at least the ones the I get a hold of.

Tools: spanner wrench

DSC00512 Unlike the Olympus that I worked on previously, the front lens plate is secured by an outter locking ring that is unscrewed.

The inner ring can be removed if you need to get in between the front lens group … this will not get you closer to the shutter blades.

 

 

 

 
DSC00511Under neath is a plate that changes the amount of light hitting the exposure meter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ok here is where you will need the special tool … welllll I don’t got one, so I am stuck with only going this far.

I tried using a rubber friction tool, but this front group was really secured … probably never taken off before.

Not much access to anything here.

So, how did I free the shutter? As is common with many shutters, the rear lens cell can be unscrewed. This allowed me to access the blades, and get some fluid on it to loosen it up.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rolleicord … the front end.

I was finally able to get a hold of a Rollei TLR. This Rolleicord III came in a pretty banged up state. The front cover metal was bent out of shape … and I think some prevous owner continued to use the camera. The mechanisms all appear to work, so my job is to get it somewhat back in shape.

I will say that TLR’s are one of the easiest cameras to work on … hmm, I think I may have said this before … as they seem to be so mechanically similiar that it is easy to work them out.

The hood did not close cleanly … this is because it was also bent out of shape. This was the easy part, as all I needed to do was lightly twist (and push) the opened hood until the metal leafs were back in alignment.

The magnifier was also too flappy … the pivoting pin has slipped out of one side. It appears that one of the metal sides was also bend out of shape, so just needed to be pushed back into position to keep the pin from moving sideways.

I ned to get the front cover off. Carefully peel off the leatherette. You should be able to get it off in one piece as it has a paper backing.

Note: if you just want to get at the blades you do not need to remove the cover. You can just unscrew the front element.

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Next unscrew the knobs from the shutter, aperture, and speed arms.

The four large shiny screws hold the entire front onto the the rest of the camera. I suggest you go with the inner layers. Remove the four small brass screws hold the outside cover plate on. The next set of five screws holds the lens/shutter.

Lift and jiggle to get these two covers off.

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You will notice that there is a hidden arm (lower left corner) that is coupled to the lens/shutter plate … this arm is used to move the paralax correcting screen in the viewfinder. Make a mark to note its position if you take the screw off.

Lets look at the shutter since we are here …

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Very typical.

Unscrew the front lens element.

Then turn the lock.

Twist the cover to match up with the notches.

 

 

 

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Always note the position of the speed cam … and all the little thingies that ride the grooves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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… and there we are.

The shutter cocking ring sits in the middle here and is spring loaded … so it may pop out. This image shows it in firing position.

 

 

 

 

You can continue to take of the rest of the front by removing the four large screws … and as I noted before, the arm for the parallax correction.

DSC00514

Note where the shims go.

At this point you can also get at the viewing mirror to clean it … but watch out for the ground screen.

 

 

 

 

The front cover was the major fault on this camera. The sides and top of the cover had been impacted by things (it had to be more than once to affect that many areas).

DSC00513

You can unscrew the retaing ring and all those layers of dials will slide right out.

Use a wood dowel and a hammer to tap out the dents.

Before putting it back together, remember to clean the old lube off and make the numbers easier to read.

Add a little dab of new lubricant between the dials. After you secure the retaining ring, make sure everything is moving smoothly.

Set the shutter and aperture to their topmost position so you know where they are when you put the front plate back on. Don’t secure it until you know that the dials have coupled with them properly.


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