Category Archives: Cameras

Brownie Hawkeye clean up

Tools – Philips screwdrivers, and cleaning stuff

Ok, so I thought I would clean up the old Brownie. Looking through the viewfinder was a mat of dust particles, and the lens was covered with something.

The front metal cover plate is secured by four screws.

Push down on the viewfinder glass, on top, to maneuver the metal plate off.

Many things will just fall out at this point … so make sure you grab them all.

 

 

 

There is actually no lens element in front the shutter, just a square glass protector.

The Viewfinder is just held together with pressure from a spring plate and the front metal cover.

 

 

 

The back end is removed by the two internal screws.

Under that is one spring washer.

 

 

The camera lens can be popped out by pushing from the inside.

 

 

 

Pull off the metal plate and it will reveal the shutter mechanism.

Not much here.

… and that’s all folks

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Ricoh Wide … some cleaning

Tools: Spanner wrench, screw drivers, pointy tweezers

When I first worked on this camera it had a shutter tripping problem, which I fixed, but I did not record what I did before putting it all back together … and then ended up on the mantel.

Sooo, I decided to take it apart again just to show you stuff.

Take your spanner wrench and remove the outter ring.

Then you can take the inner cover off.

 

 

 

 

 

Now unscrew the shutter speed dial and remove it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unscrew the front lens group.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take your pointy tweezers and turn the locking dial, then you can rotate the shutter cover to align the notches.

Remove the speed cam.

 

 

 

 

Now you can see the shutter in all its glory.

Note that the shutter cocking ring is spring loaded to will want to pop out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now cleaning the view/rangefinder

Open the film back and secure the rewind arm from the inside … then unscrew the rewind knob.

Use the tweezers again to unscrew the film speed cover screw and pull off the plates. Then unscrew and remove the plate holding the winding arm. Remove the arm.

Remove the three screws, around the sides, that secure the top cover. Using the tweezers again, unscrew the rewind knob cup. Remove the flash shoe … then pull off the top cover.



The Ricoh Wide -24-

There were many many fixed lens rangefinder cameras that came out over the past 100 years, but not many with a wide angle lens. Cameras with wider than 45mm focal length lenses started appearing from 1949.

The Ricoh Wide was one of these, it is also known as the Ricoh Wide 24 or 2.4 … and no, it did not have a 24mm lens. It was make in 1958 or possibly 1960, not sure exactly as I have seen reference to both dates.

  The Ricoh Wide was a 35mm format coupled rangefinder camera with an S Konimar 35mm f/2.4, and a Seikosha MXL shutter. This lens was made by Nitto Kogaku (they started optics working in conjunction with Nikon and then started their own lenses … and they are still in business today). The camera designed is also shared with the Ricoh 300 which used a Riken 45mm f/2.8 lens.

 


Pots … no, not that kinda Pot.

So, got the mechanical parts working on the Yashica Mat-124G … now to figure out how to adjust the light meter.

This camera has a CdS light meter which requires a battery, unlike the burnt out selenium light meters that many older cameras started out with. Sometimes these meters is just not right anymore and require adjustment … sometimes they just don’t do nothing.

A basic circuit consists of a CdS photoresistor, a resistor/potentiometer, power source, and a galvanometer … so how hard could it be to adjust … the Yashica Mat-124G appears to have two potentiometers … hmm.

The first thing to do is to remove the hood. On the left side of the body is a lever that turns the light meter circuit on and off as the hood is opened/closed. The big round thing in the back of the light meter is the galvanometer. To the left of it are the two potentiometers. There are two arms that are coupled to the shutter speed and aperture dial. The speed arm rotates the galvanometer, while the aperture arm moves the aperture target (the yellow arm).

One thing that I did find was that the galvanometer has a cap that the aperture target is attached to. The target arm is pushed as the aperture dial is moved. The seal that was holding the cap in place was broken, so the cap was not in its correct position (looks likes one of the previous owners had dislodged this and also bend the galvanometer arm) … I figured out that the aperture should be set wide open before repositioning the cap.

Trial and error … playing around with all the parts I got the meter to read almost accurately. I still have to figure out the best position of the potentiometers to get some accuracy in low and bright lighting conditions.

… and I say again, thanks to Rick Oleson’s handy dandy CD of tips and for sharing his vast amount of knowledge -> http://rick_oleson.tripod.com … and also Hans Kerensky -> https://www.flickr.com/photos/29504544@N08/albums

 


Yashica Mat-124 G … winder side, not side-winder.

This camera has a problem with setting the shutter. A complete wind does not set it, so you can never take a picture … hmm, sounds like something is not coupling correctly.

The first thing you have to do … and you already know this … is to remove the leatherette. Take off the one back/strap holder arm before removing. With the one that I have here it was fairly easy to peel the leatherette off without damaging it. Take your time.

Push out the winding arm pin. Remove the arm and the four items that go with it.

Now you can unscrew the plate.

The rotary disc for the winding arm it attached with a circular nut.

Note the position of the golden arm.

Unscrew it and remove the stuff underneath it.

 

Remove the spring from the counter reverse lever (right), remove screw and take out arm.

Remove the 12/24 exp indicator plate, first pull off the two springs.

Pull out the silver gear.

The counter change gear arm (bottom) is the next to go.

The counter dial has a spring loaded screw in the middle. Take that off with the dial and the dial plate underneath it.

 

 

 

The counter reverse lever (top) is held on by one screw on the right. Slightly lift the arm on the left to pop it off for removal.

One screw holds the winding stopper arm (centre) , and you should release one arm of the spring.

The middle golden gear (bottom) has one pin screw in the middle that is unscrewed clockwise … very important.

 

 

 

Now you can remove the winding assembly by taking out the four screws.

Now you can see the shutter cocking arm … and in my case it is bent upwards. This means that it will never push down to its full distance.

You can try to rebend it back into shape.

If you want to take that part out you will need to remove the front lens/shutter component.

Here is my bad attempt at bending the arm down … which actually caused more metal fatigue, so when I put it back in it bent itself out of shape again.

Note: on the back side of this part is a riveted switch that prevents double exposures … do not damage this part, as it will cause a lot of headaches. If this part does not freely move, the winder will be in a locked position after the shutter is released. I am guessing this is why some people force the winder and bend the arm.

As I mentioned before, the Yashica Mat-EM has the exact same part (just not golden) so you can just replace it.

When putting back together you should be very careful that the arm is positioned above the shutter release mechanism.

You will also need to reload the spring on the counter dial. If the counter dial is not spinning freely, then loosing the screw and move the dial around so it sits properly.

… and be aware of the little springs that are all over the place.


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