Author Archives: Dennis

Tanks.

As expected, the number of visitors to my blog has been increasing since its start just some 4 years ago … so thanks for viewing my stuff (not that stuff). This year I actually got over 10,000 views. I don’t think I will be breaking any blog records with that, but it is nice that my efforts are not worthless.

As I briefly mentioned in a previous post … I am a little delayed in my new ones. I’ve run into some parts issues that have prevented me from posting, but they will be up soon (I hope) …

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Opps …

Made some errors on my mercury battery post … which is now corrected.

Blame the beer !!!


I pity the tool !!!

Sometimes yah just can’t win … many cameras utilized specalized manufacturing techniques to get everything together. When servicing these camera’s, you really should have the tools that were designed to work on these things.

One of them is a flexiclamp/ring wrench, the tool to remove the various retaining rings used on cameras without scratching them.

Some are very specific to a camera … which I just found out about the Canonet QL17 G-III. I encountered difficulty getting into the shutter mechanism because the front lens group put up a fight. Most other cameras of this type that I have worked on just required a spanner wrench or a rubber friction thingy … not this camera.

Screen Shot 2017-11-09 at 7.02.50 PM

This tool is used to work on the front lens group (as noted in the service manual).

I can see why this is needed … the group is screwed on very tightly so friction doesn’t work. A spanner wrench is too wide to fit in the tight space. Even using my super strong stainless steel tweezers didn’t work, even though I could force it wide enough to connect to the slots, I could not get enough grip to prevent it from slipping.


G is for ggggrrrrreat !!!

Ok, so as you know I am in the habit of introducing the camera’s that I get to take apart … probably just so I can add a new post to keep this blog alive.

The Canon Canonet QL17 G-III. QL = quick load, 17 = f/1.7, the G = “grade up” … heah, that is what Canon states on their Museum site … and Canonet, well that’s just something someone in marketing thought up. So does this mean this is the third grade up version, hmmm (Orig. Canonet, New Canonet, and Canonet G-III … though there has been a number of other Canonets made)?

CanonQl17GIII_DxOAnywho, the G-III was in production for 10 years starting in 1972. It appears to be a very popular model for modern photographers looking for a point and shoot film camera. Some make claims that it is the poor man’s Leica? I don’t really believe that, it don’t look like no Leica that I know of … hmm, maybe a CL … ah, that’s stretching it.

The camera has a mechanical shutter, with auto abilities if you want to slap a battery in it. The highly praised 40mm lens, 6 elements in 4 groups, is probably where the comparisions to Leica come from … many on the web say so.

Warning … I may not be immediately posting any of the new cameras any time soon, as they all seem to putting up a lot of resistance to change.


Rollei, rollei, rollei … keep them wagons rollei’n.

Soooo, I finally ended up with a Rollei TLR … though not the one I really wanted, but heck Rollei’s are over-priced these days so I had to make due with a Rolleicord.

The Rolleicord is the little brother of the infamous Rolleiflex. Franke & Heidecke decided to make a cheaper (more economical) version of their very popular Flex line of twin lense reflex cameras … this way more amateur photographers could get a hold of a high quality camera.

The Rolleicord line started in 1933, and there were many variations of it over the 44 years it was in production. The Rolleicord is easily recognized by its knob winding, instead of the crank winding that the Flex’s have.
rolleicord_DxO

I got this one in … of course … “for parts” condition. It has issues with the shutter, the shutter lever knob is bent and not really attached, the leatherette is distrested, and probably a number of other things that are broken.

I was reading up on various versions made by F&H and the model I have appears to be a Rolleicord III with a Triotar lens … 1950-53.

The Triotar, as you may guess, is a triple element lens … and even though it sounds like a simple cheap setup, it can produce some nice dreamy images. It appears that it is very favourable to portrait photographers.

Ok for you Bokeh lovers !!!


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