Monthly Archives: November 2016

The logical thing to do …

Sooo, some time ago I decided that I needed a larger screen MacBook than my 13″ model … and also wanted a newer year that could support MacOS Sierra (2010+) … so I went on a hunt for one. I decided I should try to get one that was broken … yeah not a smart idea, but I also have experience with computer hardware … so I took a chance.

I did find one that met my requirements … but sadly there was a major glich. The auction description and specs were wrong, so now I have a MacBook Pro 15″ 2009 … the good thing is that I got refunded, and got to keep the notebook.

Ok, so first problem … MacBook immediately panics at book. I booted up with an external drive with Windows 10, and it booted. Hmmm, so possibly OS is corrupted. So, I reinstalled the OS … still get a panic. Swapped the memory out with the ones from my 13″ … and it booted without panic. Great. Bought a couple of 4GB DIMMs … one for each.

Now one thing … in my web research on MacBook panics, I kept running into the GPU issue. It appears that a number of models with a discrete GPU had manufacturing issues and over heating caused it to fail. I installed a temp meter and kept an eye on it … and many times the CPU temp got up to 100C just surfing the web with multiple tabs. I also ran a GPU stress test and did not notice any video failure. … anyway, I decided just to take this thing apart … because that is what I do (remember the toilet story).

Thanks to iFixit I got down to the heat sinks.

logicboardThats what the underside of the logic board looks like. There was dust bunnies on everything, including in the vents and fans. I cleaned up everything and put new thermal paste on.

Right now I have Safari open with two tabs, Lightroom, and the WordPress app … CPU temp is 69C and the fan is running at 2300RPM. Seems to be running about 10C lower in temp when scanning though my LR library … and most important is that the top of my thighs aren’t baking.


Baby Yashica (44)

The Yashica-44, as described earlier is a 127 format TLR … and this one had a problem that the shutter mechanism was jammed.

In order to get to the shutter you have to take the front panel off and that means revealing the screws. The leatherette is brittle (like the Primo-Jr) so you will not be able to salvage it. You will need to take off the leatherette underneath the shutter cocking arm and the sync lever.

Remove the four screws from the front plate. Set the sync to between M and X. Carefully pull off the cover … and note that the flash port has a wire attached to it, so you will not have much play … tilt the left side of the cover plate up and then shift the cover to the right.

Now typically the problem with shutters is that they get gummed up with something … and with a lot of cameras with Copal shutters you can just unscrew the front lens element and then flush the shutter with Ronsonol … I decided to take a closer look.

 

 

Since the shutter was jammed I took the covers and speed cam off of the shutter and took a look. The shutter would cock, and the release released … but not much happened. I cleaned up some gummy stuff and put some Ronsonal on the shutter blades. This helped a bit, sometimes the shutter would release but most of the time not. Hmm, confusion … so I searched the web.

There appears to be a problem that plagues certain Yashica TLR’s … the shutter jam (and not the blueberry kind). In researching the disassembly/repair of the Yashica-44 I came across a number of forum posts concerning shutter jams. In most cases there is a warning from others about forcing the self timer lever if the camera is set for M Sync, or if the shutter is gummed up.

I added some arrows to point at different levers that line up with the speed cam

I took a really close look around the self timer mechanism and discovered … wait for it … still wait … a bent arm. A shutter release arm/lever moves down when the shutter is released, and normally fits into an open slot of the self timer arm. If the self timer is engaged the shutter release arm/lever will will stop at the self timer arm until the slot turns around to the correct position … thus letting the shutter completely release. I am guessing the shutter arm/lever (whatever you want to call it) was bent by the action of someone forcing the self timer lever while the shutter mechanism was partially engaged (possibly due to gummed up shutter blades).

Note: when the sync lever is set to M, a metal cover comes up to stop the self timer arm from engaging … so don’t try to force it, because it is supposed to not work.

Remember to check the pins after putting the speed cam back on … also the shutter release lever is on a spring so it will need to be pushed down a bit when putting the front cover back on.


Yashica-44

The Yashica-44 was Yashica’s answer to the Baby Grey Rollei. It was one of the first Japanese copy cats (it is believed the Primo-Jr came out first) of the 4×4 Rolleiflex … and it was so much a copy that Rollei took them to court about the appearance of the camera … Yashica was forced to make some colour changes, and the first version did not last long before it was replaced by the 44A (the 44A’s got teeth). There are 7 (8) different colour versions … and they also made a version with a light meter (LM).

If you really want some great info on Yashica TLR’s, including the 44, you should check out Paul Sokk’s site … everything you wanted to know about Yashica TLR … so I won’t say much more than this.

… and 127 film is still available for purchase.


… note # x

When repairing more than one camera … remember which parts go with the right camera.

Back tracking numerous months … earlier this year I got a hold of a number of TLR’s. I started working on one, then set it aside and starting working on another … then left them for a bit.

When I came back to put back one camera I was stumped on how to put it back together … for some reason I could not get the front panel on … I logically tried to figure it out … I researched the web … I asked some questions … but for some reason it did not fit … then it occurred to me today, since I was working on similar cameras (both Yashica’s) that I put the wrong lens on the wrong camera !!!

Sooooo, note # x … keep different camera parts in separate areas so you do not mix them up.


It’s getting colder …

I am getting reminders by Mother Nature that it is coming to that time again where I spend most of my time indoors … so that means I will have to get back to the workbench.


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